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(Video) Sunday Rewind: Weekend Ag News Review

Another week has come and gone.  Here is a review of the agriculture news you might have missed over the weekend! Friday: Friday's in the Field: The combines are back in the field across southeast Nebraska, a week after rain and snow stalled all progress... Friday Five: This week’s agr...

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(Video) Sunday Rewind: Weekend Ag News Review

Another week has come and gone.  Here is a review of the agriculture news you might have missed over the weekend! Friday: Friday's in the Field: The combines are back in the field across southeast Nebraska, a week after rain and snow stalled all progress... Friday Five: This week’s agr...

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Throw Out Water Rule, Farm Bureau, Others Tell Texas Court

WASHINGTON, October 18, 2018 – A 2015 rule that expands the federal government’s control over private land nationwide should be vacated in its entirety, attorneys argued in papers filed with the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas. AFBF and a broad coalition of business gr...

844-368-0444

(Audio) "Chat with the Chancellor" with Special Guest, Dr. Hank Bounds, UN-System President

This month is the first part of a two-part special edition of “Chat with the Chancellor”.  Brandon Benitz and the President of the University of Nebraska system, Dr. Hank Bounds, focus entirely on research across the University of Nebraska system. This month, Dr. Bounds,  digs into the deta...

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(740) 775-8362

The combines are back in the field across southeast Nebraska, a week after rain and snow stalled all progress. On this edition of Friday's in the Field, we hear from Andrew Neujahr near Waverly.  Neujahr is in his first year as a full-time producer and shares thoughts on the current conditions a...

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(312) 738-8033

The sugar beet harvest is moving slowly, after the snow on Oct. 14, followed by freezing temperatures in the single digits. Even with the weather delay, Jerry Darnell, Western Sugar vice president of agriculture for the South Region said the harvest is still 50 percent done. Last year the factory...

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Crops

(Video) Sunday Rewind: Weekend Ag News Review

Another week has come and gone.  Here is a review of the agriculture news you might have missed over the weekend! Friday: Friday's in the Field: The combines are back in the field across southeast Nebraska, a week after rain and snow stalled all progress... Friday Five: This week’s agriculture news review recaps Nebraska’s tourism campaign, the Sea of Blue and Gold taking over Indianapolis and more... Saturday: Locking pliers to be produced once again in DeWitt: 3163329251   Early freeze slows sugar beet harvest: The sugar beet harvest is moving slowly, after the snow on Oct. 14, followed by freezing temperatures in the single digits... Sunday: Conference for Kansas Women in Agriculture Set in Manhattan: delineature...   Looking Forward: The 91st National FFA Convention and Expo will kick off in Indianapolis, Indiana later this week.  The Rural Radio Network will be on location and providing updates throughout the week.   ICYMI: Two new farm broadcasters in the Peters house.  Congratulations to RRN Farm Broadcaster Shalee Peters! Two little sweethearts decided to make their presence known a little early. Welcome to the world Walter Tommy and Henry Micheal! Walt needs a little help breathing but for the most part, all is well! ???????? (385) 425-2715 — Shalee Peters (@bspfarms) October 18, 2018

2019 Conference for Kansas Women in Agriculture Set in Manhattan

Keynote speakers have been announced for the award-winning Women Managing the Farm Conference, set for February 7-8, 2019, in Manhattan, Kansas. Since 2005, this event has been bringing together women farmers, rural business leaders and landowners. The Women Managing the Farm conference provides a supportive setting in which women can develop the skills, resources and knowledge needed for success in a competitive agricultural environment. Conference sessions are designed to keep women up-to-date on the latest advancements in agriculture and thriving within their rural communities. During the two-day conference, attendees select from presentations covering many topics, including farm finances, relationships and health, agricultural and estate law, crop production and marketing, management, and more. Attendees also choose networking sessions tailored to the different roles women hold, such as agricultural partners and helpers, independent producers, absentee landowners, ag industry career women and business managers. Optional pre-conference workshops are offered on Wednesday, February 6, which include sessions about precision agriculture technology, viticulture and enology, as well as introductory and advanced sessions on QuickBooks. The 2019 conference will open Thursday morning with a presentation by Dr. Jayson Lusk, a food and agricultural economist who studies what we eat and why we eat it. Other general session presenters for 2019 include Attorney Stacey Seibel, who specializes in estate planning law and will present, "Designing the Future of the Farm - Estate Planning to Make the Farm a Perfect Fit for the Next Generation;" Dr. Mykel Taylor, KSU Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics, who will discuss "Navigating Negotiations;" and Amanda Freund, a third generation family farmer who manages three farm businesses, a dairy farm, a farm market and bakery, and their value added product, CowPots. Registration for the conference is available at 7349445885, with an early bird rate of $140 available through December 14, 2018. After this date, the regular registration fee is $160 through January 25, 2019. The Women Managing the Farm Conference is sponsored by various agricultural organizations. More information about speakers, programs, exhibitors, registration and scholarships can be found at the website, womenmanagingthefarm.com, or by calling 785-532-2560. Keep up-to-date with the latest Women Managing the Farm news through (581) 545-0611.  

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CFTC Staff Issues Updated Report Assessing Agricultural Block Trades

Washington, DC — The Commodity Futures Trading Commission’s (CFTC) Market Intelligence Branch (MIB) today issued a report entitled Updated Report: Agricultural Block Trade Analysis  (October 2018), that updates findings from a July 2018 report that analyzed agricultural block trading in the grains, oilseeds, and livestock markets at the CME. This new report includes data for the time period of January 8, 2018, when CME launched block trading to the full suite of agricultural futures and options products, through September 2018. Access the original report at (847) 473-3631(July 2018). Block trades in the agricultural markets are a very small portion of the overall volume, but are somewhat more significant on specific dates and for certain contract months. Block trades are primarily occurring in nearby months. Market makers appear to be offsetting much of the block volume into the central limit order book. The prices of all block trades reviewed appear to be priced within the CME rule for “fair and reasonable” prices. MIB staff will continue to engage the industry as block trading develops.  This report is part of a series of MIB reports.  MIB is a unit of the CFTC’s Division of Market Oversight.  Part of MIB’s role is to analyze and communicate current and emerging market issues to CFTC leadership and the public and assist the CFTC in making informed policy.

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Livestock

(Video) Sunday Rewind: Weekend Ag News Review

Another week has come and gone.  Here is a review of the agriculture news you might have missed over the weekend! Friday: 775-525-8956 Friday Five: This week’s agriculture news review recaps Nebraska’s tourism campaign, the Sea of Blue and Gold taking over Indianapolis and more... Saturday: Locking pliers to be produced once again in DeWitt: Malco Products hosted a grand opening Friday evening of their manufacturing facility in DeWitt.    Early freeze slows sugar beet harvest: (915) 667-3313 Sunday: Conference for Kansas Women in Agriculture Set in Manhattan: Keynote speakers have been announced for the award-winning Women Managing the Farm Conference...   Looking Forward: The 91st National FFA Convention and Expo will kick off in Indianapolis, Indiana later this week.  The Rural Radio Network will be on location and providing updates throughout the week.   ICYMI: Two new farm broadcasters in the Peters house.  Congratulations to RRN Farm Broadcaster Shalee Peters! Two little sweethearts decided to make their presence known a little early. Welcome to the world Walter Tommy and Henry Micheal! Walt needs a little help breathing but for the most part, all is well! ???????? pic.twitter.com/BbiHlLg5hn — Shalee Peters (@bspfarms) October 18, 2018

Court order stalls Arkansas hog farm permit decision

A judge has further delayed an Arkansas hog farm's permit application to operate near the Buffalo River watershed. Newton County Circuit Judge John Putman issued a stay Wednesday on an order issued in August by the Arkansas Pollution Control and Ecology Commission. The order had reopened the permit application process for C&H Hog Farms, the (786) 916-0146 reported. The farm is permitted to house about 6,500 hogs on Big Creek. The commission decided in August that the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality erred in issuing a final decision denying the farm's new operating permit. The commission's order required environmental regulators to issue a final decision on the farm's permit application. Regulators had issued a notice of a (336) 610-5020 last month that would deny the operating permit to C&H Hog Farms. The draft notice, issued Sept. 17, opened a public comment period on the decision to deny. C&H had requested the stay on the commission's order Sept. 6. The judge's ruling this week stalls regulators from taking action on the application for the time being, according to the hog farm's attorney. Putman also ordered another stay on the department's January permit denial that would've prompted the farm to close. The second stay allows the farm to continue operating under its expired permit. Putman's ruling means the commission's permit denial effectively hasn't been issued, said Chuck Nestrud, one of C&H's attorneys. Richard Mays, an attorney for intervening environmental groups, called the farm's actions a tactic to delay the permitting process until the Arkansas Legislature or another entity can help the owners keep their farm open. "It's an unsuitable location for a hog farm, so they're trying their best to obfuscate and delay and hope that somebody will come to their rescue," Mays said. Opponents of the farm have argued that it could pose a pollution risk to the Buffalo National River area.CP

Cattle on Feed w/Jerry Stowell *AUDIO*

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.4 million head on Oct. 1, 2018, USDA reported Friday. The inventory was 5 percent above October 1, 2017. This is the highest October 1 inventory since the series began in 1996. The inventory included 7.09 million steers and steer calves, up 2 percent from the previous year. This group accounted for 62 percent of the total inventory. Heifers and heifer calves accounted for 4.31 million head, up 11 percent from 2017. Placements in feedlots during September totaled 2.05 million head, 5 percent below 2017. Net placements were 1.99 million head. During September, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 425,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 330,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 430,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 466,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 280,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 120,000 head. Marketings of fed cattle during September totaled 1.72 million head, 4 percent below 2017. Other disappearance totaled 57,000 head during September, 2 percent below 2017. To view the full Cattle on Feed report, visit 910-602-4119 USDA Actual Average Guess Range Cattle on Feed: On Feed Oct. 1 105.0% 106.3% 105.6-107.4% Placed in September 95.0% 100.0% 96.7-105.0% Marketed in September 96.0% 96.7% 95.9-99.3%   Listen to the report here: [audio mp3="/media.ruralradio.co/wordpress/2018/10/Cattle-on-Feed-10-19-Jerry-Stowell.mp3"][/audio]  

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Technology

More Than 65,000 Expected in Indianapolis Oct. 24-27 for 2018 National FFA Convention & Expo

INDIANAPOLIS (Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018/National FFA Organization) – Next week, the city of Indianapolis will transform into a sea of blue jackets when the National FFA Convention & Expo kicks off for the ninety-first time. This time-honored tradition, where innovators and leaders of tomorrow come together, will be held in the Circle City Oct. 24-27, 2018. More than 65,000 FFA members and guests from across the U.S., representing all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, are expected to attend the event. Convention and expo events will take place at several venues in downtown Indianapolis and other surrounding areas. FFA members and advisors will meet in Bankers Life Fieldhouse, where eight of the nine general sessions will be held. At the Indiana Convention Center, members can explore the expo or expand their minds by attending a variety of workshops or participating in educational and career success tours. This year, the theme of the convention and expo is Just One, and the national officer team is excited to share this with all of those in attendance. "FFA members know that every life moment, milestone and journey starts with just one – just one step, just one conversation, just one action. Together, we can make an impact on our chapters, our communities, our future," 2017-18 National FFA President Breanna Holbert, a student at California State University, Chico, said. "The convention and expo is an opportunity for members to come together and learn from one another." It's estimated that the national convention and expo will have a $40 million impact on the city. Attendees will stay in 115 hotels throughout the Indianapolis area. The convention and expo will kick off with the FFA band leading a grand march down Georgia Street in downtown Indianapolis on Wed., Oct. 24. The march will end at Bankers Life Fieldhouse and usher in the start of the opening session. That evening, Garth Brooks, the reigning Country Music Association Entertainer of the Year, will take the stage for a private show for convention attendees. John Deere will also commemorate 75 years of partnership at the convention as well. On the morning of Saturday, Oct. 27, the eighth general session will be held in Lucas Oil Stadium where American FFA Degrees, the highest degree for an FFA member, will be bestowed upon more than 4,000 FFA members. Throughout the week, convention and expo attendees will also be able to experience the inaugural Blue Room, a 17,000-square-foot interactive area that showcases the cutting-edge technology, research, and innovation taking place in agriculture. Through experiential learning and a specific focus on the most critical challenges facing our communities—from respecting the planet to feeding the world—The Blue Room will inspire and equip students to activate their potential. AgriNovus Indiana and Microsoft are the title sponsors of this experience. In addition to attending various events, FFA members will also be lending a helping hand to the greater Indianapolis area as part of the National Days of Service. Places where students will be giving back to the community include Gleaners Food Bank, Maplelawn Farmstead, the Indianapolis Cultural Trail, Indianapolis City Market, St. Vincent DePaul Food Pantry and more. The National FFA Convention & Expo is scheduled to be held in Indianapolis through 2024. The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to 669,989 student members who belong to one of 8,630 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The organization is also supported by 459,514 alumni members in 2,236 alumni chapters throughout the U.S.

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Partnership aims to boost precision ag efforts

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Officials say that a partnership between Kansas State University and a global company that provides precision agriculture technology is likely to benefit farmers in the state and across the country. Several company representatives from Topcon Agriculture were in Manhattan Oct. 4 to announce that they have established an office in the K-State Office Park, located next to the KSU Foundation on the north side of campus. Fabio Isaia, the company’s chief executive officer, noted that the partnership includes conducting research and innovations that farmers want to use; opportunities for K-State faculty and students to work with new technologies; and interacting with farmers through the state’s extension service. Isaia noted that Topcon has similar agreements with universities in Europe, China, the United Kingdom, Moscow, Tokyo and Italy, “but none of these have the extent and the depth of what we’re trying to develop here.” “We believe this is going to be different, not just because we are in the heart of the agricultural business in North America, but because this is Kansas,” Isaia said. “Due to weather conditions and soil variability, Kansas is the place where we can develop studies and validate our solutions on so many crops that we will be able to utilize not only in North America, but all over the world.” Brian Sorbe, Topcon’s vice president of sales and marketing in North America, called his company the “new kids on the block” in precision agriculture. “But over the past 12 years, we have built a very robust catalog of technology solutions for farmers,” he said, noting that the company has other university partners which have strengths in field management, animal science or other specific areas. “When we came to K-State, it really has a nice meld of all of those things. We wanted to be part of this atmosphere which is already rooted deep in ag DNA, as we call it.” Ajay Sharda, an assistant professor of biological and agricultural engineering at K-State, said the partnership will include work with such precision technologies as crop sensors, rate controllers, GPS technologies and more. “(K-State faculty) have come a long ways in precision agriculture over the last four to five years,” Sharda said. “We have a great start to our research program with numerous collaborative research projects with multiple industry partners. We are continuously getting newer opportunities to work on more relevant and high impact projects both from industry and federal agencies.” Sharda noted that he doesn’t expect Topcon to be the last precision agriculture company to find a home at K-State: “This will ultimately start to put ourselves in the lead to establish similar (partnerships) with other industry partners to realize what we have envisioned of a research park on the K-State campus.” Topcon’s Manhattan office will include a lab and classroom in which K-State faculty and students will conduct research with many of the newest technologies that the company has to offer. The company is also donating equipment and technology to the university’s Agronomy North Farm. “What it really represents for us is an intersection between academia and innovation within our organization,” said Jared Ochs, Topcon’s customer support manager. “But we also want the university to gain some key components. We have worked with department heads to inject new things into curriculum that will give students a leg up in their careers and against other schools that offer precision agriculture.” Topcon Agriculture is a division of the Topcon Positioning Group, which has its U.S. headquarters in Livermore, California. The global headquarters for Topcon Agriculture is in Turin, Italy. The company expects to have 20 employees in its Manhattan office.

Sorghum Checkoff and National Sorghum Producers Launch "Sorghum Smart Talk" Podcast

LUBBOCK, Texas – The United Sorghum Checkoff Program (USCP) and National Sorghum Producers (NSP) launched the first installment of their joint podcast, Sorghum Smart Talk, on Oct. 8. The podcast will primarily be hosted by John Duff, renewables program director for the Sorghum Checkoff and strategic business director for NSP. Sorghum Smart Talk’s mission is to increase education on grain marketing in sorghum and to provide growers and industry stakeholders with applicable information from credible resources in a format accessible at home, on the road or in the tractor. “The way farmers consume media is changing as fast as the technology on their farms,” said Jennifer Blackburn, external affairs director for NSP and USCP. “This podcast will serve as a new avenue for us to reach producers with timely, relevant information that will help make more informed decisions on the farm.” The first series of podcasts will be over profit and risk analysis, contracting and other marketing related topics. John Miller, owner of Southwest Agribusiness Consulting Inc., will be the show’s first guest. Miller has a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Texas A&M University and started the firm, which provides comprehensive price risk management services to producers and users of agricultural commodities throughout the Southern Plains. Future series will cover a variety of industry related topics such as grain marketing, agronomy, regulatory and legislative issues and will feature leading agricultural experts. For updates regarding Sorghum Smart Talk, visit SorghumCheckoff.com, and follow @SorghumGrowers and @SorghumCheckoff on Twitter and Instagram. Updates are also available on Facebook. Episode 1: Cash Marketing with John Miller This episode of Sorghum Smart Talk kicks off our marketing education series and features information on cash marketing, market history and a look into focused price risk management at the farm level. Our guest is John Miller, owner of Southwest Agribusiness Consulting Inc. Episode 2: Meet Your New NSP Chairman – Dan Atkisson In this episode of Sorghum Smart Talk, we sit down with Dan Atkisson, newly elected NSP board chairman. Duff and Atkisson discuss farming, family, leadership and the importance of engaging in agriculture policy in Washington, D.C., and beyond. Atkisson is passionate about his new role within NSP and plans to use his past experiences to improve the agricultural industry and the sorghum industry. Episode 3: Cost of Production with John Miller In this episode of Sorghum Smart Talk, we visit with podcast guest John Miller, owner of (208) 863-9887. about cost of production, accounting and cost tracking for your operation. Sorghum Smart Talk is available on semisecrets, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, 607-444-2558, Libsyn and 8156940990.

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Ag Policy

Throw Out Water Rule, Farm Bureau, Others Tell Texas Court

WASHINGTON, October 18, 2018 – A 2015 rule that expands the federal government’s control over private land nationwide should be vacated in its entirety, attorneys argued in papers filed with the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas. AFBF and a broad coalition of business groups, along with the state of Texas and others, are suing to do away with the 2015 “Waters of the United States” rule issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers. Plaintiffs say the rule is illegal for a host of reasons, including that it disregards statutory and Supreme Court requirements that federally regulated “waters” be at least closely connected to “navigable” waterbodies. The illegal 2015 rule instead regulates “vast tracts of the United States, including millions of miles of man-made ditches and municipal stormwater systems, dry desert washes and arroyos in the arid west, and virtually all of the water-rich Southeast.” The current filings in Texas mark the third time a federal district court has been asked to strike the 2015 rule. Federal courts in North Dakota and Georgia are also currently considering similar claims by dozens of states and business organizations. The rule has been temporarily blocked in dozens of states pending the outcome of the litigation.

703-413-1563
Lenders Need to Work with Farmers Hit Hard by Hurricane Michael, Georgia Farm Bureau President Says

 Farm losses in Georgia following Hurricane Michael last week are going to make it hard for farmers to cover operating loans unless lenders can offer some latitude on payment. Gerald Long, president of the Georgia Farm Bureau, said loan repayment is one his biggest concerns for fellow farmers trying to recover in his state after the devastation. Hurricane Michael hit every major sector of agriculture in the state, including cotton, pecans, poultry, and fruits and vegetables. The Georgia Department of Agriculture summed up early estimates as reported losses, noting, "... the numbers are staggering." The losses could approach $3 billion. "The devastation of this storm has got a very, very long tail on it," Long told DTN. Gary Black, Georgia's agriculture commissioner, said, "These are generational losses that are unprecedented, and it will take unprecedented ideas and actions to help our farm families and rural communities recover." Black added, "The meter started at $1 billion and jumped quickly to nearly $3 billion. Unfortunately, we are not quite sure where it is going to stop." With the costs now required to be in production agriculture, Long said most farmers need operating loans to cash-flow the crop season. Following the hurricane, too many producers just aren't going to be able to pay on their loans after the storm. "To be in production agriculture, it's just phenomenal how much money we have to borrow, and it's very obvious there will be many, many, many farmers who will not be able to service their debt this year because of the damage that's been done," Long said. Farm Bureau, officials from the state department of agriculture, and leaders from the Georgia Bankers Association have scheduled a meeting Tuesday to talk about what can be done to adjust loan obligations for farmers and livestock producers. "We need to meet and reach an agreement on what we can do, whether it's refinance to meet their debts," Long said. "It's going to take some federal assistance just to help with it." Long also pointed to devastation in the timber industry -- Georgia is the country's top timber state -- that will have a lasting impact on landowners who have lost timber that was reaching maturity for logging. Timber losses are projected at 1 million acres, valued at $1 billion. "For many of them, that timber represents their savings account, and it's totally gone," Long said. "So it's not just the row-crop farmer who was hit out there. The effect that's going to have on communities is just going to be devastating." Long noted farmers who have crop insurance will get some protection, but the Southeast will need some disaster assistance similar to that provided to farmers last year in Florida and Texas after hurricanes hit. Even then, many farmers will be hard pressed to meet loan obligations. "The disaster aid and the crop insurance will not make it so producers can meet their debts," Long said. "We've got to get with our lending institutions to try to get them to understand. So something has got to be done." With low prices followed by crop disasters, Long pointed to the risks to the economy throughout the Southeast from Hurricane Michael and from Hurricane Florence in September. He suggested Congress may need to find a way to directly support agricultural lenders through lower-interest loans. "We don't want any more loans because we've got plenty of loans," Long said. "But if that's the only thing that is going to help us survive until next year, that really should be an option. As far as government assistance, I'd rather not have it, but we're in a critical stage now." Florence caused an estimated $2.4 billion in agricultural losses just in North Carolina, including nearly $1.9 billion in crops and livestock losses. Hurricanes Florence and Michael come as lawmakers are in final talks to complete a new farm bill and extend the safety net programs for farmers. Farmers in states hit hardest by the hurricanes may need to come together to see if changes can be made to help those producers recover, Long said. "We're going to have to do something to stabilize the economy in these towns, and I think that's going to be very, very important," Long said. On his own farm near Bainbridge, Georgia, Long said his peanut crop was being harvested this week and "looked decent," but his cotton crop basically was stripped. His farm's vegetable business was reopening late Friday, Oct. 19, after closing before the storm hit. "But it's devastated a lot of our fall vegetables -- our peas, our green beans, cantaloupes," Long said. Long said he still doesn't know the state of his cow-calf herd. The storm hit during calving season, and a lot of the cattle spend their time in the woods. Fencing was destroyed all around along with trees, but it's unclear how many cattle he may have lost. "We've had as many as nine people working on fences at any one time, and we've just touched the tip of the iceberg," he said. While all that recovery work goes on, harvest is falling behind for some crops, he said. Under current farm programs, USDA started sending out checks in early October for the 2017 Price Loss Coverage/Agricultural Risk Coverage programs. Georgia farmers were projected to receive about $144.3 million. As DTN Farm Business Editor Katie Dehlinger reported Thursday, ARC/PLC payments for the 2017 crop are down dramatically from earlier years. To read more on the topic, visit /www.dtnpf.com/… USDA's Market Facilitation Program, or "trade aid" program was set to pay about $46 million for Georgia, of which $42 million was expected for cotton. Yet, one of the big rules for receiving the aid payments is that the MFP is based on actual reported production. Cotton farmers were expecting record yields this year, the Georgia Department of Agriculture stated, but crop losses could run from $300 million to as high as $800 million. "The final loss estimate will be dependent on the ability to harvest what remains in the field," the department stated. "You have got to report that production for the trade payment," said Long, who raised this point with USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue last weekend. Long said farm organizations and others are going to have to work with Congress to see if some law change can be made for farmers who were hit with a crop disaster this year. USDA's Farm Service Agency Administrator said Thursday on the radio program Adams on Agriculture that, nationally, USDA has received about 97,000 applications under the Market Facilitation Program for about $300 million. The first round of aid payments was expected to be about $4.7 billion. USDA is expected to determine later this fall if another round of trade aid payments will be made.

USMCA a Framework for Future Trade Deals

A White House adviser says the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement is a model for future trade agreements. USMCA will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, if approved. Kevin Hassett, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said this week that other potential agreements will “look very much alike, and very much like this,” according to Politico. His comments come as the Trump administration this week announced the intention to seek bilateral free trade agreements with Japan, The European Union and The United Kingdom. However, the Trump administration this week also threatened to apply tariffs on Europe’s auto industry. That is also similar to the NAFTA talks, as the U.S. pledged, and threatened, tariffs, depending on how the negotiations were moving. The U.S. and the EU first agreed to explore an agreement this summer.

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Markets

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